From Patterson Garden, University of Saskatchewan.

My hubby and I spent a few days earlier this month in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, so I could attend some workshops during the University of Saskatchewan’s annual Hort Week.  I had such an amazing time and met so many nice people, plus I learned a lot about plant diseases, insect pests and controls, and Prairie-hardy trees and shrubs.   Over the next few posts, I’ll share some pics from the trip – this was our first time to Saskatoon and I was impressed with the beauty of this city on the South Saskatchewan River.

One of the stops we made was to tour the University’s Patterson Garden, a public arboretum.  We actually went there over two evenings because (a) it has so many trees and shrubs to explore and (b) the mosquitoes chased us out the first night!  The mozzies were INSANE while we were there – I’m not one of those people who are typically bothered by them, but I was practically eaten alive this trip.   One of the participants in the insect pests workshop worked for the City of Saskatoon and he said that according to tests they had done, the mosquito population hadn’t yet reached a record peak, but it was close.

Here is more information about Patterson Garden, from the U of S’s website:

The University’s Arboretum was established in 1966 and contains one of the most diverse collections of trees, shrubs, and vines in the Prairie Provinces. Species from northern regions of the world as well as historic cultivars developed by pioneer plant breeders are on display. All specimens are labeled with common and scientific names. An invaluable reference for horticulture and botany, the picturesque site is also used for photography, field trips, and strolls.

The Arboretum is located in zone 2b of the hardiness zones of Canada, experiencing a sunny continental climate with cold snowy winters and hot summers. Despite climatic extremes many woody plants thrive here, responding to well-defined seasons and long hours of summer sunshine.

Patterson Garden Arboretum is a garden attraction of Canada’s Garden Route. It is nearby to the campus area and is open to the public throughout the year, free of charge, from sunrise to sunset.

We came across this beautiful rose with fading flowers near the end of the second evening – it is not a named cultivar, at least not according to the plate, which read:  Rosa 73846001 (J5 Rose).   Most of the plants had their planting dates marked on the plates, but not this one, so I’m not sure how old it is.

Gorgeous!

IMG_9618

I hope you have a wonderful weekend!  What plans do you have (gardening or otherwise)?

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34 thoughts on “From Patterson Garden, University of Saskatchewan.

  1. Nice rose – shame about the mozzies! We are in the middle of an unseasonal heatwave here so much of the weekend will be spent watering containers! They seemed such a good idea in spring! I mustn’t complain but some rain at night would be nice 🙂

    • Thank you very much! You know something?…I can’t recollect if it had a fragrance; I don’t believe it did. Nothing that made me take notice, and I was pretty close to the plant to take the photo. Now I wish I could go back and double check! 🙂

  2. Lovely photo of the rose. We haven’t had too many mosquitoes here this year…yet! Have a lovely weekend Sheryl. I shall be sowing my last batch of basil this weekend, and eating ice cream! 😉

    • Glad you haven’t had the mosquitoes – it’s actually been fairly good here in Calgary, too (especially compared to last, post-flood). I don’t think I’ve ever experienced an infestation as awful as in Saskatoon, though!

      Sowing basil and eating ice cream seems like the most delightful ways to spend a weekend, I love that! And I firmly believe there should be some ice cream in my future as well… 😉

  3. Gorgeous rose, indeed, but what a pity about the mosquitoes. 😦 The website for the Canada Garden Route is great. Have you visited many of the gardens mentioned?

  4. Your trip to Saskatchewan sounds wonderful–one more place I’d like to visit! I’ll try to find a time to go when it’s not mosquito season, though!

    • Definitely a great idea – it’s not pleasant to do any outdoor activity when the mosquitoes are as bad as that! I was really taken with the city of Saskatoon, it’s so beautiful and they’ve retained many of their old architecture. And they have a fantastic pathway system by the river – you can go for kilometres!

  5. Sorry about those mosquitoes they can sure ruin a good thing. I love to visit gardens and beautiful places with trees but I do not enjoy those pesky mosquitoes at all. That is a very beautiful rose and a terrific picture of it. Hugs

  6. Mosquitos must have their use in nature but I never understand why so many and so big ;0) Beautiful photos and lovely flower. Well, it is a busy weekend for me, I have class in an hour but got side tracted..as you see here ;o) I better run along. have a good one! Johanna

  7. Fantastic trip, can’t wait to hear more about the Garden and the workshops you attended. I know what you mean about the mosquitoes. I’ve had that happen too where it just becomes unbearable. they like me too and I can end up covered head to toe in welts if I’m not careful.

    • Too many mosquitoes can really put a damper on the enjoyment of being outdoors, that’s for sure! It’s amazing how persistent and irritating they can be…although from what I hear, black flies can be even worse. We all could do without! I will definitely post some more photos and stories from my experience in Saskatoon – it was so much fun!

      Hope you had a fun, sunshine-filled weekend!

    • It’s definitely a zone fit for only the hardiest of plants, that’s for sure! It’s incredible how many different species can thrive in those conditions, though – a real wonder!

      Hope you had a delightful weekend! 🙂

  8. I love to visit our local botanical gardens and arboretum as there is so much to see. Right now our 80 year old agave plant is blooming (since July 8th) and it is stunning! Beautiful picture of a rose – you captured all the colors… 🙂

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