Calgary snapshot: Central Library.

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In November of last year, the doors opened to an absolutely gorgeous new library in Calgary.  Central Library’s Snøhetta-designed new home is a striking, light-filled mix of glass, wood, concrete, and steel.  The graceful curves and oh! that skylight! captivated me when my hubby and I visited on opening weekend.

Check out 100 Reasons to Love the New Central Library, a compendium of fun facts about this spectacular space!

P.S. If you look down into the lower part of the photo, you’ll see a life-sized statue of a bison.  Created by Cree artist Lionel Peyachew, it is made out of pieces of stamped metal representing words in various Indigenous languages.

The 2019 Prairie Garden: Growing Food.

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One of my favourite times of the year is when the new issue of The Prairie Garden arrives in my mailbox!  This themed, annual digest has been in publication for a whopping 63 years and I am delighted to have been a contributing writer since 2011 (although I missed 2015 and 2017). This year, the theme is Growing Food and it includes my article “Integrated Pest Management.”  Check out The Prairie Garden‘s website for more information about the book and the other featured writers, as well as for details on how to order both the new book and available back issues.  (The book is also available for purchase in select bookstores, garden centres, and nurseries in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta).

Flowery Friday.

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Just look at those pollen grains! To my delight, my zygocactus is blooming for the second time since Christmas. I recently heard someone describe the blooms as resembling graceful ballet dancers – I love that fanciful comparison!

Flowery music.

Some of you may remember this fun post from last year…but I’ve added some fresh new tracks and updated all the links so you can click and listen to “flowery music!” I love all the song suggestions readers have offered – if you think of any more, let me know! Enjoy!

Flowery Prose

A song I hadn’t heard in eons came on the radio the other day and I got to thinking about song titles and then that somehow morphed into thoughts about the garden, as pretty much everything does…  At any rate, this post is the result of my brain meanderings, and hopefully some fun for everyone who participates.

Let’s come up with songs that have “flowery” subjects in the titles!  It’s a chance to perhaps hear some tunes we haven’t in a long while, some awesome ones and some maybe a bit more middling….  😉

THE RULES: Songs must have a variation of the words “garden” or “flower,” or the name of a specific flower, vegetable, fruit etc. in the TITLE.  (Not in the lyrics).  Otherwise, everything and anything goes (well, except the really offensive stuff – let’s keep this above board). 

Go ahead and post the title of the song…

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Flowery Friday.

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Flashback to mid-summer last year and a public planting found in a playground in the Beltline area of Calgary.  That mix of foliage textures and the pop of lime green, yellow, and pink-purple (possibly combined with the fact that it was crazy late in the evening and I hadn’t eaten supper yet) made me drool.

Pretty much any colour is making me drool right now….the absolutely bananas weather has given me a serious case of cabin fever!

Book review: Starting and Saving Seeds by Julie Thompson-Adolf.

 

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Starting and Saving Seeds – Julie Thompson-Adolf  (Minnesota: Cool Springs Press, 2018)

I’m a bit gaga over this book – as far as I’m concerned, for new gardeners, it is the best book on the subject of seed starting and saving that I have seen so far.  Beautifully written in accessible language that you don’t need a botany degree to understand, Thompson-Adolf’s Starting and Saving Seeds covers all the important stuff: germination, grow lights, heat mats, seed tape (DIY!), propagation and growing media, containers, winter sowing, and wet/dry processing of harvested seeds.  Most of the book is taken up with plant profiles and specific seed starting/saving tips for each one, delving into veggies, herbs, and flowers.  I was pleased to see crops such as asparagus included – not one that we here in zone 4 often grow from seed (we usually use crowns), so the tips are especially valuable.  The expanded section on tomato seeds – apparently a subject near and dear to the author’s heart – will be bookmarked by many readers, I’m certain. This fantastic reference guide is a must-have!

*Quarto Publishing Group generously provided me with a copy of Starting and Saving Seeds; as always, my opinions about the book are my own.