Alberta snapshot: Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary.

If you’ve been following Flowery Prose for a while, you may remember that in July of 2016 my brother, my hubby, and I took a trip out to the Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary, near Cochrane, Alberta. We had such an amazing time on the interactive tour that we decided to go again in early March of this year.  What a treat!  The wolfdogs were still sporting their fluffy winter coats and the absence of green grass and leaves on the trees gave us a different perspective than we had in the summer.  The Sanctuary has taken in more wolfdogs since we were last there, and staff and volunteers have built more enclosures to comfortably house them.

WDSFPNormandeau1Photo courtesy R. Normandeau.
The ravens love to steal the excess treats from the wolfdogs. The birds and wolfdogs are very tolerant of one another…aside from an occasional bit of stink eye.  😉 

We did the interactive tour once again and had a blast feeding and meeting some of the beautiful residents of the Sanctuary, as well as learning more about wolfdogs and the unfortunate reasons a rescue like this is so badly needed.  The highlight of the trip, however, was when the wolfdogs all spontaneously set up a chorus of howling, joining together to sing for us.  My brother was quick on the draw with his cellphone and he generously allowed me to share with you the audiofile he recorded:

Audio courtesy D. Mueller.

So wonderful!  If you’re interested in learning more about – and/or supporting – the work that the Sanctuary does, click here.  If you plan to travel in this part of Alberta, it’s a highly recommended stop – the staff are incredible and it is guaranteed that you will totally fall in love with the wolfdogs. ♥

WDSFPNormandeau2

Alberta snapshot: Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary.

Zeus and Kaida

My brother, my hubby, and I had the incredible opportunity to take a guided, interactive tour at the Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary near Cochrane, Alberta a couple of weekends ago.  The sanctuary is a permanent home for several rescued/surrendered wolfdogs (and one coydog), all of which would probably not be alive today without this amazing facility and its staff.  (The Sanctuary also rehomes adoptable wolfdogs).

Education about wolfdog behaviour and correcting the unfortunate misinformation about their breeding is the focus of the talk that accompanies the tour, and the highlight was the ability to feed treats to some of them (and get in a few pats if willing).  The high content wolfdogs such as Zeus and Kaida in the photograph above, are of course not receptive to touch but they were certainly keen on the chicken we offered!  If you want to learn more about the Sanctuary and its work (plus see photos and learn the histories of the other wolfdogs), check out their website here.