Alberta snapshot: Badlands in Drumheller.

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Drumheller, Alberta – Interpretive trail, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology

My hubby and I recently spent a day with two awesome friends in the starkly beautiful Badlands of Drumheller.  If you are planning a trip to Alberta or haven’t been to Drumheller in awhile, it is well worth however many kilometers you have to drive/swim/jetpack to get there.  Make sure you at least walk part of the trail system, and tour the Midland coal mine site nearby.  And don’t forget to spend a few hours in the incredible Tyrrell Museum!

Cabins at Brown-Lowery Provincial Park.

Well, the icy sidewalks finally got the better of me last week…I’m down for the count with a broken wrist.  If there’s anything good about the whole situation, it’s that I didn’t break my dominant hand and I can still (sort of) type!  I’ve never broken any bones before so I’m being an incredibly massive wimp about it, LOL.

Before all this nonsense occurred, my hubby and I managed to get out for a late afternoon trip out to Brown-Lowery Provincial Park, a little hidden gem just outside Priddis, southwest of Calgary.   We’ve lived here twenty years and driven by the place countless times, but never knew it was there, just waiting to be explored.  (Isn’t it strange how we sometimes miss things right under our noses?).  There aren’t any camping spots – just several short interconnected hiking loops and some fabulous scenery.  We chose the Old Mill loop, so-named as it was the site of a (presumably small) sawmill operation about a century ago.  We battled waning sunlight the entire trip, both because of the time of day and due to the canopy of old, very dense forest (full of fungi and moss and lichen).  I’m excited to go on a wildflower hunt out there in the spring – I have a feeling there will be some wonderful treasures to photograph.

At one point we came across a couple of mostly demolished cabins, which we of course had to explore, even though there is very little left to see.  I wonder about the people who lived there – I assume they were mill workers, rooming together.  Or maybe the mill’s owner and his family?  Perhaps these were not year ’round accommodations.  We found part of a bedframe in one and a tin of some kind.  It is interesting to speculate.

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Have you explored any new places or ideas lately?